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December 2010

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Calendar President’s Message Affiliate News STAARScopes from Rice University McDonald Observatory Workshops CAST 2010 Pictures and Videos STAT Award Winners On the Brink of Success The Physics of a Karate Chop CAST 2011 Art Contest Contacts
Volume 54, Number 4
December 2010
Inside:
CAST 2010:
• STAT Award Winners • Pictures and Videos CAST 2011 Art Contest Classroom Tips & Hints and more...!
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The Official Newsletter of the Science Teachers Association of Texas
Contents
Calendar President’s Message Affiliate News STAARScopes from Rice University McDonald Observatory Workshops CAST 2010 Pictures and Videos STAT Award Winners On the Brink of Success The Physics of a Karate Chop CAST 2011 Art Contest Contacts
About Us
We are STAT, the Science Teachers Association of Texas. STAT is committed to the enhancement of the teaching of science in Texas at all levels and in all science disciplines. For STAT Position Statements, go to: http://www.statweb.org/positions STAT is: o A statewide organization of elementary, middle level, and high school teachers, college educators, supervisors of science, and others dedicated to maintaining the highest levels of science and education in our schools. o A chapter of the National Science Teachers Association o Visit the NSTA site STAT seeks to: o Serve as a unified voice for the science teachers of the state. o Keep science teachers and other members informed about current trends in science education. o Provide opportunities for members to examine techonology, curriculum, materials, and services. o Inform members of local, state and national meetings, conferences, seminars and workshops related to sciences. o Cooperate with other science oriented organizations and teacher associations in the promotion of teaching of science. History: STAT, Science Teachers Association of Texas, was formally organized in 1957 during the 4th Annual Conference for the Advancement of Science & Mathematics Teaching (CASMT). STAT membership is now more than 7,000 strong!
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Calendar President’s Message Affiliate News STAARScopes from Rice University McDonald Observatory Workshops CAST 2010 Pictures and Videos STAT Award Winners On the Brink of Success The Physics of a Karate Chop CAST 2011 Art Contest Contacts
Calendar..............................................................4 President’s Message .........................................5 Affiliate News ....................................................7 STAARScopes from Rice University.............8 McDonald Observatory Workshops ...........10 CAST 2010 Pictures.........................................12 STAT Award Winners ....................................14 On the Brink of Success.................................16 The Physics of a Karate Chop.......................17 CAST 2011 Art Contest ..................................19 STAT Contacts .................................................20 Elected Officers.....................................20 Appointed Positions ............................20 Affiliate Congress.................................21 Texas State Board of Education..........22
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July
Calendar President’s Message Affiliate News STAARScopes from Rice University McDonald Observatory Workshops CAST 2010 Pictures and Videos STAT Award Winners On the Brink of Success The Physics of a Karate Chop CAST 2011 Art Contest Contacts
NCSE (National Congress on Science Education) 2011: NSTA’s Chapter and Associated Groups Nasco Science DivisionMeeting STATellite Newsletter July 12 - July 16 Winter 2010
STAT1012
February
November
STAT Board Meeting February 19-20 Fort Worth, TX STAT Legislative Committee Meeting February 18, 12:00 noon Fort Worth, TX TSELA Winter Meeting February 18 Museum of Science and History, Fort Worth, TX ISEA Conference February 25-27 Marble Falls, TX
CAST 2011: The Art of Science November 3-5 Dallas, TX
STAT1012
March
NSTA National Conference March 10-13 San Francisco, CA
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Calendar President’s Message Affiliate News STAARScopes from Rice University McDonald Observatory Workshops CAST 2010 Pictures and Videos STAT Award Winners On the Brink of Success The Physics of a Karate Chop CAST 2011 Art Contest Contacts
A Message from President Palmer
Well, the holiday season is here. Along with it come the American holiday icons: Santa Claus, Rudolph, Frosty, and let’s not forget the Grinch and Scrooge. I think the Grinch and Scrooge have gotten a bad rap. Sure they were mean and selfish, but in the end they saw the light and had a change of heart. In November, the State Board of Education demonstrated that they, too, can have a change of heart. In September, the Board canceled the 5-8 supplemental adoption and did not vote to send the 9-12 adoption to the State Legislature. After four STAT members spoke to them at their November meeting, they changed their minds. They voted to send the reinstated the 5-8 supplemental adoption and voted to send it and the 9-12 supplemental adoption to the Legislature for funding. It was clear that Commissioner Scott wanted to use the science adoption as a bargaining tool to get funding for the language arts adoption. Even though we have had success with the State Board, the battle is not yet over. The Board votes to approve the proclamation, but only the Legislature can vote to spend the money to fund it. The Legislature will be voting on budget deficits this coming January. They will decide whether to fund the language arts and the science supplemental adoptions. The state is facing a huge budget deficit. I have heard numbers like 25 billion dollars. Yes, that is billion with a “B”. If we are to have any hope of getting the science supplemental adoption, we need to let the state Legislators know of our concern. At the State Board of Education meeting, the Board voted to send the state 1.8 billion dollars from the Texas Permanent School Fund. We need to ask our representatives what they are doing with all that money. This link will take you to an article about the Texas Permanent School Fund: http://www.texastribune.org/texas-education/stateboard-of-education/permanent-school-fund-reboundswith-market This link http://www.fyi.legis.state.tx.us/will let you enter your address and find out who your state representatives are. Look them up, contact them, and let your voice be heard.
The STAT Executive Committee poses with Dr. Bob Ballard at CAST 2010. Left to Right: President-Elect Ross Ann Hill, Treasurer Laurel Frank, Vice President Tony Zahn, Dr. Bob Ballard, Past-President Patsy Magee, President Joel Palmer, and Secretary Deidre Parish
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Calendar President’s Message Affiliate News STAARScopes from Rice University McDonald Observatory Workshops CAST 2010 Pictures and Videos STAT Award Winners On the Brink of Success The Physics of a Karate Chop CAST 2011 Art Contest Contacts
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Affiliate News
Texas Earth Science Teachers Association TESTA
by Gail Gant, President What a wonderful success CAST 2010 was! TESTA presented an array of workshops, short courses, and field trips that provided participants with a wealth of activities they could put to immediate use in their class rooms. Teachers learned how to get their students engaged in science by building water rockets. Altering variables to see which fin pattern worked best made experimenting an exciting endeavor. Other sessions provided attendees with ideas for hands-on activities on earthquakes and volcanoes, the rock cycle, teaching topography and drainage systems. Other workshops and field trips explored our solar system and Earth’s place in it. Friday afternoon TESTA held its annual Rock Raffle. An array of specimens ranging from classroom sets of rocks to very special single specimens were raffled off over a few exciting hours as participants, having chosen their favorites, waited anxiously to see if they held the winning ticket. The entertaining and informative Charles Swift kept the action moving. The lucky winner of the grand prize repeated the success of her young son the year before. What are the odds of winning twice in a year? Many thanks to the many vendors who donated great gifts to our Rock Raffle including Wards Scientific, Geoblox, Supporting Science. Inc, Earthly Delight’s and Dinah-Might Adventures, LP. Perhaps it was our location at the entrance of the exhibit hall; perhaps it was the record-breaking number of attendees, but TESTA signed up more new members than ever before! We welcome our new members and look forward to being a resource for them as we move forward. A great place for new members and any other teachers in search of activities to start is the Share-a-thon. The Share-a-thon is typically held on Saturday mornings and I encourage teachers to begin planning now to share any successful activities at next year’s Share-a-thon. We all learn from one another and the Share-a-thon is a great way to network, help others, and find cool new labs for your own classroom. This year TESTA tried something a little different. Instead of a luncheon or breakfast, we held a social at a nearby pub. TESTA provided dessert for attendees as they enjoyed one another’s company in a relaxed atmosphere. Transportation was provided by Lucky’s, thus relieving attendees of the hassle of parking. Thank you Houston for your hospitality. CAST 2010 was a bustling hive of productive activity. TESTA looks forward now to 2011 in Dallas. We hope to see you there.
Calendar President’s Message Affiliate News STAARScopes from Rice University McDonald Observatory Workshops CAST 2010 Pictures and Videos STAT Award Winners On the Brink of Success The Physics of a Karate Chop CAST 2011 Art Contest Contacts
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STAARScopes from Rice University
by Reid Whitaker
Calendar President’s Message Affiliate News STAARScopes from Rice University McDonald Observatory Workshops CAST 2010 Pictures and Videos STAT Award Winners On the Brink of Success The Physics of a Karate Chop CAST 2011 Art Contest Contacts
W
ho knew that Rice University was helping science teachers prepare for STAAR with STAARscopes? The Rice Online Learning Experiences K12 Project in the Center for Technology in Teaching and Learning (cttl.rice.edu) at Rice University hosts TAKScopes, a web-based curriculum management system for K-5 science teachers that is currently used in over 11,000 Texas public and charter school classrooms across the state. In the summer of 2011, TAKScopes will morph into a new program called STAARscopes (aptly names for the new Texas learning assessment and standards - STAAR) and will expand to include middle school science and high school biology. STAARscopes will feature new components that will provide a plethora of resources and activities for teachers to teach science concepts and scientific process skills.
differentiates this program from other commercially available curricula systems is the combination of Texas state standards (called the TEKS – Texas Essential Knowledge and Skills and the 5E instructional model). These were the building blocks for the entire system. With the state and district accountability a prime focus, teachers needed resources that not only were hands-on and content-rich but also reflected mandated key concepts that students were to be tested on. “TAKScopes is able to bridge the need for standards-based instruction with fun, engaging, and relevant science,” states Maria Picon (a teacher in Bryan ISD). “It makes science fun to teach. I used to be scared to teach science but TAKscopes makes it easy and relevant. I’m not scared anymore!” During the design process of TAKScopes and STAARscopes the site was teacher-tested to ensure its user-friendliness. In a recent survey of over 100 teachers, 87% noted the ease of use as the number one reason for TAKScopes’ continued use. “This is a huge accomplishment!” states Reid Whitaker, Director of TAKScopes/STAARscopes and the Rice Online Learning Experiences K12 Project. “The complexity of using online programs is still a major reason why teachers don’t use on-line systems. Our programs eliminate that hurdle!”
The program starts with taking a prescribed learning objective (such as learning about magnets which is identified as 1.6B in the TEKS) and creating a teaching unit around the specific science concept called a scope. Currently, TAKScopes has over 101 scopes or learning units. The program uses the validated 5E strategy of teaching in order to organize the all of the learning experiences within a scope. The 5E method consists of engaging the student; exploring the concept through a hands-on activity; explaining the learning topic through questioning, discussion, and vocabulary review; elaborating or extending the learning through reading, writing, doing math, or further inquiry; and finally, evaluating the student’s mastery of the topic through performance-based, criterionreferenced, and interactive assessments. TAKScopes is currently used in 145 public school districts comprised of over 550 Texas schools serving K-5 students.
TAKScopes was created in 2006 to address teachers’ need for rigorous, accurate, and engaging science resources. A feature that
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Offers from Rice University (cont’d.)
And it even has subscribers in Latin America. Many school districts use the program as their core curriculum to teach science. “As a classroom teacher, I watched the transformation of my students’ science knowledge and skills as result of using TAKScopes. “I am excited now to be able to oversee the creation of the new version of this program - STAARscopes,” states Andrew Ginakis, Associate Director. STAARscopes will have new interactive learning components such as virtual lab investigations and science songs that students can use with Guitar Hero or Dance Dance Revolution. “Our goal is to get teachers to love to teach science so their students will love learning science,” states the Director, Reid Whitaker. “We can do this by offering a variety of ways to tackle science concepts and by making science applicable to students from all backgrounds and from all levels of achievement.” Check out TAKScopes and learn more about STAARscopes, by visiting www.TAKScopes.com. You can preview the site by logging on with ID: guest and password: guest.
Calendar President’s Message Affiliate News STAARScopes from Rice University McDonald Observatory Workshops CAST 2010 Pictures and Videos STAT Award Winners On the Brink of Success The Physics of a Karate Chop CAST 2011 Art Contest Contacts
For more information about the Rice Online Learning Experiences (K12) Project, please email reid@rice.edu or call us at 713-348-5433.
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McDonald Observatory Workshops
by Marc Wetzel Summer Workshop Opportunities from McDonald Observatory
Deadline for application for all three workshops is February 8, 2011.
Calendar President’s Message Affiliate News STAARScopes from Rice University McDonald Observatory Workshops CAST 2010 Pictures and Videos STAT Award Winners On the Brink of Success The Physics of a Karate Chop CAST 2011 Art Contest Contacts
Workshop #1
Light and Optics June 23-25, 2011 Recommended for Grades 8-12 20 SBEC credit hours 3 days/2 nights
Explore how astronomers use lenses, mirrors, prisms, and diffraction gratings in building astronomical instruments and telescopes. Build a cardboard spectrometer, and perform activities that explore light at many wavelengths, such as the infrared region of the spectrum, that you can do in your own classroom. Learn how NASA develops astronomical instrumentation for its missions. Recommended for physics and astronomy teachers. NASA provides support for this workshop under grant #NNX10AC68G.
Workshop #2
From the Big Bang to Black Holes June 27-29, 2011 Recommended for Grades 8-12 20 SBEC credit hours 3 days/2 nights
How did the universe begin and how might it end? These are questions that have puzzled philosophers and scientists for thousands of years. Modern measurements from NASA and ground-based telescopes and recent mathematical studies help us refine our scientific view. In this workshop, activities will range from the life cycle of stars to the size, scale, composition, and possible fate of the universe. The topics are especially suitable for teachers of high school Astronomy or Earth and Space Science. NASA provides support for this workshop under grant #NNX09AJ33G and priority for scholarships will be given to those teaching underrepresented populations.
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McDonald Observatory Workshops (cont’d.)
Calendar President’s Message Affiliate News STAARScopes from Rice University McDonald Observatory Workshops CAST 2010 Pictures and Videos STAT Award Winners On the Brink of Success The Physics of a Karate Chop CAST 2011 Art Contest Contacts Workshop #3
Formation of Planetary Systems July 7-9, 2011 Recommended for Grades 6-12 20 SBEC credit hours 3 days/2 nights $600
Where do planets come from? No matter how many planets you think are in our solar system, astronomers have discovered over 490 planets orbiting other stars and see evidence of planetary formation throughout our galaxy. Perform activities that explore light at many wavelengths, such as the infrared portion of the spectrum that is used to study planetary disks ‹ the birthplace of planets. Build a Galileoscope to take home to your classroom. Perform activities on how stars and disks change over time, and compare ground based observing with NASA space missions. The fee for this workshop is $600 ($100 deposit due by April 16 and balance due by June 7). Fees cover lodging, meals, registration, and instructional materials. Teachers are responsible for their own transportation. Application deadline for all three workshops: February 8, 2011 For more information and to apply for workshops, please visit: http://mcdonaldobservatory.org/teachers/profdev/
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CAST 2010 Photos
Calendar President’s Message Affiliate News STAARScopes from Rice University McDonald Observatory Workshops CAST 2010 Pictures and Videos STAT Award Winners On the Brink of Success The Physics of a Karate Chop CAST 2011 Art Contest Contacts
Click Here to See the Full Gallery of Over 900 Photos!
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CAST 2010 Feedback
Relive Moments from CAST 2010. Watch Videos of the Keynote Speakers Here.
“We had the best time ever. Everyone there made us feel special and excited about science.” - CAST
2010 attendee
Calendar President’s Message Affiliate News STAARScopes from Rice University McDonald Observatory Workshops CAST 2010 Pictures and Videos STAT Award Winners On the Brink of Success The Physics of a Karate Chop CAST 2011 Art Contest Contacts
“I heard several teachers and many vendors say that this was the best CAST ever, and that they wished CAST was in Houston every year. Y’all did a fabulous job!”
-CAST 2010 Attendee
“I have attended CAST 23 of my 26 years teaching. I think Houston has done a beautiful job. This has been the best conference ever. Thanks again for a job well done.”- Esther, Forest Brook Middle School
“After being away from the state since 1999, it was good to be back and involved with an organization that puts together a conference of such high caliber. Thank you!”
-Criss, Gilmer High School
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Outstanding Teacher Awards
Rookie - Outstanding Science Teacher
Alicia Jackson Houston ISD Houston, Texas
Calendar President’s Message Affiliate News STAARScopes from Rice University McDonald Observatory Workshops CAST 2010 Pictures and Videos STAT Award Winners On the Brink of Success The Physics of a Karate Chop CAST 2011 Art Contest Contacts
Elementary School - Outstanding Science Teacher
Sammie Von Hoene Cypress Fairbanks ISD Houston, Texas
Middle School - Outstanding Science Teacher
Melissa Duncan Frenship ISD Wolfforth, Texas
High School - Outstanding Science Teacher
George Hademenos Richardson ISD Richardson, Texas
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2010 STAT Awards
Recognition of outstanding service to the Science Teacher Association of Texas Sally Wall Clear Creek ISD Houston, Texas
Recognition of Service Award (Member)
Calendar President’s Message Affiliate News STAARScopes from Rice University McDonald Observatory Workshops CAST 2010 Pictures and Videos STAT Award Winners On the Brink of Success The Physics of a Karate Chop CAST 2011 Art Contest Contacts
A STAT member who has worked at least 20 years to improve science education in Texas Vanessa Westbrook The Charles A. Dana Center Austin, Texas
Virginia Woods Award for Exceptional Contributions and Leadership in Science Education
Individual or organization from business or industry that has made an outstanding contribution to science education in Texas Sally Dudley Delta/CPO Science Regional Sales Manager
Recognition of Service to Science Education (Business or Industry)
A non-teaching, EC-12 Administrator who provides outstanding support for Science Jeri Leonard Wylie ISD Wylie, Texas
Distinguished Leadership in Science Awards (Administrator)
For a faculty or staff member at a college or university who has demonstrated significant contributions and leadership in the development of quality science education. Peggy Carnahan Our Lady of the Lake University San Antonio, Texas
Skoog Cup
STAT member who recruits the most members over one year Kevin Fisher Lewisville ISD Flower Mound, Texas
Grady Parker Membership Award
STAT Regional Director with greatest percent increase in new members Bill Neal University of Texas at Dallas Dallas, TX
Lawrence Buford Regional Directors Award
Honorary Life Membership
Karen Hewitt Cleveland ISD Cleveland, Texas
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On the Brink of Success
by Barbara ten Brink, Ph.D.
Calendar President’s Message Affiliate News STAARScopes from Rice University McDonald Observatory Workshops CAST 2010 Pictures and Videos STAT Award Winners On the Brink of Success The Physics of a Karate Chop CAST 2011 Art Contest Contacts Mapping the Statewide Elementary Science TAKS 1 and 2
Using Item Analysis and TAKS Answer Keys, TAKS performance was mapped over time. Using these maps, beginning on page 2, • • • • • we can see trends in number of items missed per objective (1); TEKS that have been tested and missed each year (2); number of items missed for each of the elementary grades tested (3); improvement per objective even at the higher passing rates (4); and improvement overall at the higher passing rates (5).
Beginning on page 3, notice every TAKS item has been mapped per year since the inception of Elementary Science TAKS (6). Highlighted items and percentages are those that did not meet the passing standard for that year.
Click Here to view the rest of this article.
Statewide Elementary Science TAKS Analysis 2003-2007, B ten Brink, published in Leaders of Learners, Texas ASCD, January 2008. http://txascd.org/downloads/Leaders01_08-1.pdf
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Statewide Elementary Science TAKS Analysis 2003-2008, published in The STATellite, Vol. 53, No 1, February 2009, pages 23-24. http://www.statweb.org/statellite/feb-09
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http://www.tea.state.tx.us Barbara ten Brink, Ph.D. is a science specialist for Austin ISD. She has served as president of the Council for Elementary Science International and Texas Science Education Leadership Association. She can be reached at btenbrin@austinisd.org.
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by Frank Butcher Calendar President’s Message Affiliate News STAARScopes from Rice University McDonald Observatory Workshops CAST 2010 Pictures and Videos STAT Award Winners On the Brink of Success The Physics of a Karate Chop CAST 2011 Art Contest Contacts
The Physics of a Karate Chop
To calculate Dt, the time that it takes the board to stop the hand, I ask my students to estimate how much the board will bend without breaking (d). A typical guess might be 1 cm. That means that while the hand is stopping, it travels 0.01 meter with an approximate average speed v = v1/2 = 10/2 = 5m/s. Then using v = d/Dt or Dt = d/v. Dt = .01/5 = .002 seconds Now an estimate can be calculated for the average net force the board will have to exert on the hand if it is going to stop the hand without breaking. FnetDt = mDv * Fnet = mDv/Dt = (1kg)(10m/s)/.002s = 5,000 Newtons ≈ 1100 lbs The question now becomes, can the board exert a force of 1100 pounds without breaking? At least once you should experimentally answer that question with a barbell and weights. Supporting the board on each edge, place the bar in the middle of the board, parallel to the grain of the wood (important), and add weights until the board breaks. In my experiments, the maximum weight the board can support without breaking is about 200 lbs. Take care to make sure that when the board breaks, there are cushions on the floor to break the fall of the barbell. Then the fun begins. I try to have enough boards on hand so that every student can (if they wish) break a board. I use 1 x 12 boards, cut into 8-inch sections. The main safety concern is to control the testosterone level of the boys, who want to impress the girls and each other by breaking more than one board. The first year that I did this activity, after 5 classes, there was a huge mess to clean up, so in subsequent years I autographed the broken pieces and gave them to the students to show to their friends and take home to show their parents. Not only did this work to eliminate the mess, it was great publicity for the physics program. If it takes about 1100 pounds of force to stop the hand, but the board can only exert a 200-pound force, the obvious conclusion is that the board cannot stop the hand, so it keeps going and the board breaks.
H
ow can a hand break a board? We know it happens, but how do you explain it? In a physics or physical science class this question is best answered as part of the discussion of impulse and change in momentum. FnetD = mDv or FnetD = m(v2-v1)
This version of Newton’s Second Law simply says that in order to change the momentum of an object (mDv), an impulse (FnetDt) has to be applied to that object. The idea here is to apply this equation to a moving hand, get rough values for the hand’s motion, and calculate the force that the board would have to exert on the hand in order to stop it. If the board stops the hand without breaking, the final speed (v2) of the hand must be zero. The mass of a hand of course varies, but for the purpose of this activity, an estimate will do. The value I use, chosen more for convenience than accuracy, is 1 kg. To get an estimate of the speed of the hand just before it contacts the board, have a student swing his index finger through a photogate, timing its passage. With an estimate of the width of the finger and the time, you can calculate a decent estimate for the speed of the hand (v1), just before it contacts the board. A typical value is about 10 m/s.
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The Physics of a Karate Chop (cont’d.)
Students were anxious to show off their broken boards, and some kept them as souvenirs. In fact, the photo above was sent to me by a parent who came across the boards in her attic while rummaging through a box of her son’s things. Another important safety issue is to make sure that the boards are struck parallel to the grain. Struck across the grain, boards will not break and the result can be painful.
Calendar President’s Message Affiliate News STAARScopes from Rice University McDonald Observatory Workshops CAST 2010 Pictures and Videos STAT Award Winners On the Brink of Success The Physics of a Karate Chop CAST 2011 Art Contest Contacts
Physics Teaching Tidbit
It may be a bit on the ‘hokey’ side, but I kept an Einstein stamp in my drawer and rewarded my physics students for exceptional work with a tattoo on their hands. Your first thought (and mine) might be that high school physics students are too sophisticated for such nonsense, but I found just the opposite to be true. Students liked the recognition and reminded me when I forgot to give them their due. I got the stamp in the CAST exhibit hall from Teacher Stamp Company of Houston. Just another good reason to attend CAST!
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CAST 2011 Art Contest
Become a part of CAST 2011! (November 3-5 in Dallas, TX) Submit your own or one of your student’s science-themed artwork to the CAST 2011: The Art of Science contest, and have your work displayed on the 2011 Program. Over 7,000 science teachers will see your work and be inspired to discover and appreciate the art of science everyday.
CAST 2011 Art Contest Rules of Entry:
• Submit artwork that demonstrates the "art of science" or has some connection to science. • Contest is open only to current STAT members and their students eligible to submit entries in any medium. Paintings, drawings, photography, etc, will be accepted. 3-D pieces will not be permitted. • Entries will not be returned after the contest. • Art work must be original and created by the artist submitting the entry. • Art must be 8 ½” x 11” or smaller. • STAT reserves the right to crop or enlarge art in any way it sees fit. • The deadline to submit entries is January 30, 2011 to STAT@bizaustin.rr.com. • STAT’s decision of winners is final.
Calendar President’s Message Affiliate News STAARScopes from Rice University McDonald Observatory Workshops CAST 2010 Pictures and Videos STAT Award Winners On the Brink of Success The Physics of a Karate Chop CAST 2011 Art Contest Contacts
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STAT Office
Mailing Address: 5750 Balcones Dr., Ste 201 Austin, TX 78731 Phone: (512) 491-6685 Fax: (512) 873-7423
www.statweb.org stat@bizaustin.rr.com
Elected Officers
Calendar President’s Message Affiliate News STAARScopes from Rice University McDonald Observatory Workshops CAST 2010 Pictures and Videos STAT Award Winners On the Brink of Success The Physics of a Karate Chop CAST 2011 Art Contest Contacts
President: Joel Palmer
(972) 882-7388 president@statweb.org
Past President: Patsy Magee Treasurer: Laurel Frank
(409) 617-5054 pastpresident@statweb.org
President-Elect: Ross Ann Hill Vice President: Tony Zahn
(806) 892-1900 presidentelect@statweb.org
(281) 356-7797 treasurer@statweb.org
(817) 251-5519 vicepresident@statweb.org Appointed Positions
Secretary: Deidre Parish
(469) 633-5500 secretary@statweb.org
Executive Director: Chuck Hempstead
(512) 491-6685 stat@bizaustin.rr.com
Texas Science Teacher Editor: Joel Palmer
(972) 882-7388 president@statweb.org (512) 491-6685 stat@bizaustin.rr.com
CAST Exhibits Manager & Advertising Manager: Frank Butcher
(281)424-1230 frank.butcher@comcast.net
STATellite Editor:
TEA Representative: Kenn Heydrick
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(512) 463-1827 Kenn.Heydrick@tea.state.tx.us
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Calendar President’s Message Affiliate News STAARScopes from Rice University McDonald Observatory Workshops CAST 2010 Pictures and Videos STAT Award Winners On the Brink of Success The Physics of a Karate Chop CAST 2011 Art Contest Contacts Associated Chemistry Teachers of Texas
amodic@sbcglobal.net
ACT
Informal Science Education Association
kikicorry@tpwd.state.tx.us
ISEA
Amiee Modic
Kiki Corry
Texas Association of Biology Teachers
sarah.anderson@ttu.edu
TABT
Texas Association for Environmental Education
swall@gccisd.net
TAEE
Texas Council of Elementary Science
deborah_rang@roundrockisd.org
TCES
Sarah Anderson
Sally Wall
Deborah Rang
Texas Earth Science Teachers Association
ggant@sjs.org
TESTA
Gail Gant
Texas Marine Educators Association
marolyn.smith@yahoo.com
TMEA
Marolyn Smith
Texas Section of the American Association of Physics Teachers
Hugh_Henderson@birdville.k12. tx.us
TSAAPT
Hugh Henderson
Texas Science Education Leadership Association
vwestbrook@mail.utexas.edu
TSELA
Vanessa Westbrook
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Gail Lowe, Chair Lawrence A. Allen, Jr., Vice Chair Terri Leo, Secretary
SBOE District 1 - Rene Nuñez
1521 Upson Dr. El Paso, TX 79902 (915) 351-9923 (512) 936-4319 fax
William B. Travis Building 1701 North Congress Avenue Austin, Texas 78701-1494
Calendar President’s Message Affiliate News STAARScopes from Rice University McDonald Observatory Workshops CAST 2010 Pictures and Videos STAT Award Winners On the Brink of Success The Physics of a Karate Chop CAST 2011 Art Contest Contacts
SBOE District 9 - Don McLeroy
9277 Brookwater Cir. College Station, TX 77845 (979) 255-2538 (979) 846-1174 fax 22123 Skyridge Ln. Richmond, TX 77469 (512) 463-9007 (512) 936-4319 fax
SBOE District 2 - Mary Helen Berlanga
2727 Morgan Ave. Corpus Christi, TX 78405 (361) 881-1000 (361) 881-1028 fax 205 N Presa, Ste B 200 San Antonio, TX 78205 (210) 226-7106 (210) 226-7104 fax 4302 Grapevine Houston, TX 77045 (713) 433-4643 (713) 556-7243 fax
SBOE District 10 - Cynthia Noland Dunbar
SBOE District 3- Rick Agosto
SBOE District 11 - Patricia Hardy
900 N. Elm Weatherford, TX 76086 (817) 598-2968 (817) 598-2833 fax
SBOE District 4 - Lawrence A. Allen, Jr.
SBOE District 12 - Geraldine Miller
1100 Providence Tower West Dallas, TX 75244 (972) 419-4000 (214) 552-8560 fax PO Box 763337 Dallas, TX 75376 (214) 333-9575 (214) 339-9242 fax
SBOE District 5- Ken Mercer
PO Box 781301 San Antonio, TX 78278 (512) 463-9007 (512) 936-7319 fax
SBOE District 13 - Mavis B. Knight
SBOE District 6 - Terri Leo
23516 Twin Oaks Dr. RR#5 Spring, TX 77389 (281) 257-0832 fax (call first) 2165 North St. Beaumont, TX 77701 (409) 835-3808
SBOE District 14 - Gail Lowe
SBOE District 7 - David Bradley
11 Chris Ave. Lampasas, TX 76550 (512) 556-6262 (512) 556-3278 fax PO Box 1979 Lubbock, TX 79408 (806) 744-3232 (806) 744-2211 fax
SBOE District 15 - Bob Craig
SBOE District 8 - Barbara Cargill
61 W. Wedgemere Cir. The Woodlands, TX 77381 (281) 465-8095
Need to find your state legislators? Search by zip code at:
http://www.fyi.legis.state.tx.us
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